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Can i get an essay book review on any book? but in this format?…

Can i get an essay book review on any book? but in this format?

Book Review Format

A book report describes a book, telling what it is about.  A book review includes this but adds an element of persuasion.  It goes into the style of writing or the particular literary elements uses to set this book apart from others.  It should persuade the reader of the review to share your opinion.  It is a  little like the 5 Gold Star ratings we see for products.   Both offer a combination of summary and commentary.  The review is a way to think more deeply about a book you’ve read and to demonstrate your understanding.

Your review should be written in narrative paragraphs, not as a list of answered questions.  There are four (4) parts to a book review:

Introduction:  This section provides basic information about the book and a sense of what your report will be about. The Introduction includes:

I.  Title (underlined)/Author

2.  Publication Information: Publisher, year, number of pages

3.  Genre

4.  A brief introduction to the book and the review

Body:  There are two main sections for this part. The first is an explanation of what the book is about. The second is your opinion(s) about the book and how successful it is. There are some differences between reports on fiction or other imaginative writing and reports on non-fiction books. But for both, a good place to start is to explain the author’s purpose and/or the main themes of the book. Then you can summarize.

Summary:  In this section, you describe what the story is about.  One or two good paragraphs should be enough.

For fiction or other creative writing:

Provide brief descriptions of the setting, the point of view (who tells the story), the protagonist, and other major characters. If there is a distinct mood or tone, discuss that as well.

Give a concise plot summary. It should include the basic parts of the plot:  situation, conflict, development, climax, and resolution.  Along with the sequence of major events, you may want to discuss the book’s climax and resolution, and/or literary devices such as foreshadowing. 

For non-fiction: Non-fiction will not have a plot summary, but you will need to summarize what the book is about.

Provide a general overview of the author’s topic, main points, and argument. What is the thesis? What are the important conclusions?

Don’t try to summarize each chapter or every angle. Choose the ones that are most significant and interesting to you.

Analysis and Evaluation:

In this section you analyze the book and explain the particular style of writing, or literary elements used, such as foreshadowing, cliff-hanging, flashbacks, etc. You may express your opinions, but they must be supported with examples from the book.  Non-fiction may relate to the author’s qualifications to write on the subject, or the way the material is presented, such as step by step, or including photos, or even the format, such as introducing each section with the vocabulary of terms.

Here are some questions you can ask yourself, to guide your analysis.

  • Did the author achieve his or her purpose? How so? Provide examples.
  • Is the writing effective, powerful, difficult, or beautiful? How so? Provide examples.
  • What are the strengths and weaknesses of the book? Be specific.
  • For non-fiction work, what are the author’s qualifications to write about the subject? Do you agree with the author’s arguments and conclusions?
  • What is your overall response to the book? Did you find it interesting, moving, or dull?
  • Would you recommend it to others? Why or why not?

Conclusion:  Briefly conclude by pulling your thoughts together. You may want to discuss what impression the book had on you, or emphasize what you want your reader to know about it. Would you recommend it to others?  If so, whom?  Would you want to read more works by this author?  In other words, do not just say “I liked, or didn’t like the book.”  Be very specific by explaining its effect on you.

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